de-cluttering your wardrobe

How To Enjoy Life After De-cluttering Your Wardrobe

If you’ve been de-cluttering your wardrobe recently then you’ve probably been thinking what’s next?  Maybe you have been wondering how you stop yourself needing to do another major de-cluttering session?

a de-cluttered wardrobe

Well there are several steps you should take after de-cluttering your wardrobe which I’d like to share with you here:

1. CELEBRATE!

Acknowledge your achievement – how does it make you feel? Proud? Happy? Fulfilled? More relaxed?

2. GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK

If you’ve spent some time de-cluttering your wardrobe it can be tiring physically and emotionally.  So do something to fill your self up whatever that looks like.

life after de-cluttering your wardrobe

3. DECLUTTER OTHER AREAS

Recognise that by regaining control over your wardrobe may encourage you to de-clutter other areas of your life.   Not just your living space, but perhaps your digital space as well.

4. FREETIME

We lose up to 2.5 days per year looking for stuff that we have lost. That’s a whole weekend away and you’ve earned it!  So remember to book that weekend away it’s time to reclaim those 2.5 days now!

5. ENCOURAGE OTHERS

Share your experience of  with friends and family.  Help them see that de-cluttering is much more than simply getting rid of bags of unwanted clothes.

6. DONATION BOX/BAG

Have a box or bag in the bottom of your wardrobe for any items that no longer feel part of your much loved wardrobe collection.

7. SET REGULAR DATES for DE-CLUTTERing your wardrobe

Put them in your diary and stick to them.  Even if you find that reviewing your wardrobe means there’s nothing to clear out – just setting yourself regular reminders is a great way to stay on top of your wardrobe.

set dates for de-cluttering your wardrobe

8. SHOPPING

Now hopefully your approach to shopping will change as a result of de-cluttering your wardrobe!  You will know what is in your wardrobe and what might be missing. So when you go shopping there are three things you should remember:

  • Spend money only on items that you really love. If you’re seeking a second opinion in the changing room, the chances are it won’t make it to the tag removal stage in your wardrobe!
  • You know what’s in your wardrobe now so when you do see something think about how it will go with other items in your wardrobe – my rule of thumb is you should be able to style something 3 ways!
  • Be honest with yourself when you are shopping – why are you shopping?Are you unhappy about something and buying something to simply cheer yourself up – again unless the item passes the other tests then chances are it will languish unworn

more mindful about shopping

9. MONEY

Many of us are sick of Fast Fashion – cheap products, poor quality that don’t last.  Not only are they bad for the environment and are made by people who are barely paid a living wage.  BUT overcoming our attraction to buying from stores offering ‘bargains’ is sometimes more difficult.  Why?

Well it has a lot to do with how we value ourselves.

We know deep down that it’s better to buy quality pieces that will last.  They look better, are more durable and frankly with more care taken in manufacture will look better on us.

Those of us who shop in pre-loved boutiques know how fabulous it feels to find a unique piece with a designer label at an incredibly good PRICE – that’s very much the nub of it.

Buying quality means getting out of our own way on price. Many of us have hang ups about spending a lot on ourselves – often coming from a place where we’ve been conditioned to think ‘we’re not worth it’.

I work on a practical way of reframing the gut churning feelings we get sometimes when we look at the price tag.  We love it, it looks gorgeous and it will go with so much in our wardrobes but how do we justify it?

  • Consider the number of times you might wear the garment, envisage the ways you can make it work in your wardrobe (which is now a neatly curated closet where you know every piece in it)
  • Can you make it into a signature look piece – so you become known as the woman in the gorgeous blah label jacket for example?
  • Then take the cost of the item and divide it by the potential number of times you can see yourself wearing it. This is called the cost per wear.  All of a sudden it doesn’t seem so expensive does it?
  • Reflect on how long you might keep an item you really love and is a quality garment – 5 years, 10 years perhaps? Divide the cost by the number of years – again it doesn’t seem so expensive does it?

FINALLY REFLECT

What was difficult about de-cluttering your wardrobe?  It may make it easier to work out why you hang on to stuff.  What are the emotional ties – are they related to the money you’ve invested, a sense of guilt about cost v wear?

Perhaps there’s some anxiety that you have put on weight and can’t fit into some of your clothes? Maybe you have simply been hanging on to clothes because you don’t like shopping and hoping that you can put off the inevitable moment of having to buy more.

How do you stop those feelings recurring?  Well there are the steps to follow about shopping (as discussed) but do you need some practical help to understand what works for you in terms of colours and styles?

If you’re struggling with de-cluttering your wardrobe you might like to download my handy guide.

 

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